Category Archives: dog

Jack’s cataract surgery: Lessons learned

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 Jack watching (!!) my cat Hubert 4 days post-cataract surgery. (Jack’s face is a bit pink because I’d just cleaned the area around his eyes)

Jack and I have been sidekicks for about 5 years, and I’ve always considered his adoption one of the best things I’ve ever done. He’s a sweet, affectionate little guy and an absolute joy.

Several years ago, I noticed Jack bump into the curb during a walk. That made me wonder about his visual acuity (he has juvenile cataracts), and our vet referred Jack to a veterinary ophthalmologist for evaluation. The ophthalmologist tested both eyes and found that Jack had a detached retina (along with a cataract in his left eye), and had lost all vision in that eye. He also had a cataract in his right eye but she felt surgery wasn’t indicated at that point. We’ve had yearly checkups with the ophthalmologist since then, to monitor his eye health.

Fast forward to this spring when Jack had recurring inflammation in his right eye. We went to the ophthalmologist to get it checked out. She felt cataract surgery would be helpful for Jack’s right eye, and he was scheduled for further testing to better examine his eyes. His right eye was confirmed as a good cataract surgery candidate, and we started on the pre-surgical medication regimen (eye drops). 

The period prior to surgery was a little stressful, since Jack has a lot of chronic health issues that can be challenging to manage. Thankfully, his overall health remained stable and we started the more intensive pre-surgery medication regimen on schedule last weekend. Jack was able to have cataract surgery earlier this week. 

I really didn’t know what to expect in terms of outcome. My hope was that cataract removal would significantly reduce the ongoing inflammation Jack had been having, and that some level of vision would be restored — he’s become fearful of sounds outside as he’s lost his sight. I was blown away on surgery day when the ophthalmologist’s office left a voicemail saying Jack was awake and alert, surgery had gone well, and when he awoke the ophthalmologist had determined he could see again in his right eye!

There was a minor complication during surgery which precluded insertion of an intraocular lens. Although I’d hoped for lens insertion to give him the best possible vision, the ophthalmologist explained that despite not getting a replacement lens, he’s able to focus very quickly and his vision seems very good. This feels like a great example of not allowing the perfect to be the enemy of the good. He can see again…!

We went back for our 1-day post-surgery recheck on Wednesday. Here were the results:

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We still have several weeks of post-surgery care (medication and rechecks) and I’m so glad he’s off to such a great start.

I am so grateful the surgery was able to restore Jack’s sight! I’d hoped it would help, and when we go out for walks now (post-surgery), I feel an overwhelming sense of wonder and gratitude that he can see again. Even our “quick” walks have become longer since Jack likes to stand and gaze at birds (and neighbors when they’re out). He’s noticeably more confident about approaching and interacting with neighbors… before his surgery, he’d want to visit with neighbors but seemed reticent as they’d walk closer to him.

I hadn’t expected the restoration of Jack’s vision to be such a profound experience but it’s truly been awe-inspiring to see how quickly it’s improved his quality of life.

While contemplating pursuing cataract surgery for Jack, I read several client stories online to get a better sense of their (and their dogs’) experiences. Reading their stories was helpful to me. I share Jack’s story in hopes that it’s useful to others contemplating cataract surgery for their dog.

UPDATED! Fitness tech gadgets: My “road test” results

Up

I’ve updated this post based on my experience after it was published. See text in blue bold for updates.

With the holidays approaching, I’ve been seeking ways to reinforce my motivation to meet health goals. This time of year, it’s all too easy not to be active enough due to long hours at work and colder weather outside.

So, after hearing about friends’ experiences using fitness devices, I decided to try a few myself:

All three devices worked as advertised for me, although there are some caveats potential buyers should be aware of…

Jawbone UP (pictured above):

PROS –

  • Easy to wear “bracelet” design
  • Compact and unobtrusive
  • Push button to change modes is easy to use and works well
  • Tracks activity (tracks steps when not in “active” mode)
  • Tracks sleep in a fairly granular manner. Comfortable to wear while sleeping. (It’s helped me understand why I’m so tired during the day… I don’t sleep very soundly at night.)

CONS –

  • First generation product with (an apparently) high failure rate. (More on this below.)
  • Only syncs with iPhone app (no joy for folks with other smartphones or even laptop users)
  • Surprisingly, doesn’t sync via bluetooth: User must connect UP to iPhone via headphone jack
  • iPhone sync process can be fussy: I find it works best if I restart my iPhone, open UP app, insert UP into headset jack, turn up headset volume, then initiate sync right away within UP app. (It really shouldn’t require such a precise process!)
  • Progress and metrics can only be viewed on iPhone app (not able to view metric tracking/dashboard on web site)
  • Food tracking is limited
  • Doesn’t automatically sync activity metrics with my favorite fitness/food journal app, Lose It!
  • Due to bracelet design, your arms must be swinging during exercise to accurately register activity (not happy news for bikers!)

UP

Caveats:
The Jawbone UP’s early failure rate almost dissuaded me from purchasing this product. Even so, I bought at my Apple Store, taking care to keep the package and receipt *just in case*. And the failure rates are not just anonymous metrics — I know someone who is on his third Jawbone UP — the 1st two failed.

With so many reports of early hardware failure, I’m not sure I’d give it as a gift until Jawbone comes out with UP v.2

UPDATED: A big con arose for me… it completely stopped syncing. No matter what I did, it would not sync. I finally wound up returning it to Apple (where I bought it) as defective.

Fitbit

Fitbit Ultra:

 

PROS –

  • Syncs wirelessly (dock connected via USB to your laptop)
  • Comes with seemingly handy plastic clip to connect to your clothing. (More on this below.)
  • Tracks activity and sleep
  • Offers detailed online dashboard at fitbit.com
  • Offers an iPhone app, as well as a mobile web site for other smartphones

UPDATE: I decided to keep the Fitbit after the UP stopped syncing. Based on the variety of tracking devices available on the market, Fitbit is among the best. I wrapped the Fitbit “holster” in electrical tape to make it less slippery (less likely to slide off my belt), and added a layer of electrical tape inside the holster to add friction (make it less likely the device itself would slide out on its own).

CONS –

  • Sleep tracking requires inserting device into cloth wristband (I found this a little uncomfortable)
  • Sleep tracking is not as granular as Jawbone UP
  • Integrates with Lose It! mobile app but in a confusing way. (More on this below.)
  • SUPER easy to lose! It’s flown off my belt several times.
  • Fitbit iPhone app is okay but not as granular as I’d like

Caveats:
The plastic clip is slippery! It’s far too easy to lose the Fitbit Ultra (and at $99, you don’t want to risk losing it!). Integrates with Lose It! app but only populates Lose It’s exercise metrics if you burn a certain number of calories (hey, I want credit for all activity, as a motivator to be even more active!).

If you buy a Fitbit Ultra, be sure to find a way to affix it to your clothing so that it won’t fly off.

Withings

Withings Scale:

PROS –

  • Super easy to use… just weigh yourself and your weight is automatically synced to your my.withings.com dashboard
  • Easy to set up: Insert batteries, then connect scale to your computer via USB to complete set up (including enabling WIFI sync).
  • User can enable integration with Lose It! app and Fitbit dashboard.
  • Offers multiple mobile apps (WiScale app for iPhone and Withings app for Android).

CONS –

  • Expensive at $159 (see Amazon page for product details & reviews).

Caveats:
Aside from cost, no caveats I can think of. Does what it promises.

Loseit

Special mention: Lose It! fitness / food journal app

I first started using Lose It! a few years ago on my iPhone and missed it terribly when I moved to an android phone.

I love its robust food database and how easy it is to update and review my food and activity metrics.

However, since then, a Lose It! Android app has been released. Glad to see this great app available for more phones!

UPDATE to add another special mention: F.lux. It’s software for Windows, Mac, Linux, and jailbroken iOS devices. It automatically adjusts your screen brightness by time of day. If you use your computer before bedtime, it’s a must have… I installed it yesterday and noticed a big difference in how soundly I slept last night.

So what combination works best for me?

I’m still using the Jawbone UP and Withings scale with Lose It! iPhone app and web site dashboard:

  • I manually add activity tracked on the UP into Lose It!
  • Since I have Lose It! linked to my Withings scale, my weight is automatically posted to my LoseIt! account.
  • I monitor my sleep metrics via the UP iPhone app.

Both the UP bracelet and Withings scale have been a good fit for me, offering motivation while not requiring a lot of effort or workarounds.

  • I found the Fitbit Ultra works well but wasn’t practical for me because it kept coming off my belt — I decided it would be too easy to lose. (UPDATED: Fixed this with some electrical tape)
  • I recommend Jawbone UP with some reservation. It does what it does well, but seems prone to early hardware failure based on user reports. (UPDATED: And my UP failed as well. Great device, disappointing quality issues.)
  • I recommend Withings scale without reservation.
  • You can’t go wrong with the Lose It! app for iPhone and android!
  • UPDATED: F.lux is a must have, as well!

Just a few things I’ve learned from my dog

My dog, Jack, makes it his mission in life to love every person he meets, complete with big sloppy kisses. I got to thinking, what if people lived their lives more like dogs?

Here are just a few things I’ve learned from my dog:

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Sometimes it’s good just to rest quietly

 

 

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  It’s nice to share time  with good friends

 

 

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It feels good to trust, and to be trusted

 

 

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It’s important to stop & smell the roses (or grass)

 

 

jack-fierce

 

 

 

   It’s okay to be a little cranky at times

 

 

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Sometimes our friends are a lot like us, and at the same time, very different

 

 

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Be yourself

Adopt a dog and change your life (for the better)… October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month

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A year ago this month, I crossed off an item on my bucket list and adopted a 2 year old toy poodle. He had some health problems but his most serious problem was that he needed a home.

Little did I know then, by adopting him my life would change forever (in a good way).

I’d never had a dog or even taken care of a dog before. I had always adopted cats. I was completely clueless! I had no idea how often he might need to go out, or how to tell if he wasn’t feeling well.

When I adopted Jack, he looked much older than a 2-year old dog. During our initial visit to the vet, I learned he had juvenile cataracts (breed-related) and severe allergies. Thankfully, we have a great vet who monitors Jack closely and helps me ensure he’s doing well. I’m also thankful for friends with dogs who helped me learn what I needed to know to give him a good home.

What I didn’t realize when I adopted him, was how great an impact he’d have on my life.

  • I now know *all* of the neighbors who live within several blocks of my house. Going out for walks with Jack daily has cultivated my sense of community. I’ve made some wonderful friends, and it’s so gratifying to see Jack connect with other people and dogs. He’s a sweet dog and people seem drawn to him.
  • When I get home, it’s always an event! The cats might sneer, but Jack is always thrilled to see me come in the door…. even if I only left 5 minutes before.
  • Because I adopted him as an adult, I had no “raising a puppy” issues. He was already house trained and understood how to tell me he needed to go out.
  • He is very sweet and also very smart. What a great combination! He learns quickly and is very affectionate.
  • It feels great knowing I gave a sweet dog a safe and loving home.
  • I gained a loyal friend. I never really understood why dogs were called “man’s best friend” until I bonded with Jack. Now, I know I’ll always have a dog in my life.

Don’t take my word for it. Go to your local shelter, rescue group or visit petfinder.com, and meet a new friend. He/she will change your life as well!